Aug 07 2018

Baseball, Music, and Suffrage? Exploring the Music of the “National Pastime”

I Want to Go to the Ball Game. Lyrics by Ned Nye and Charles Eichel. Music by Albert Von Tilzer

I Want to Go to the Ball Game. Lyrics by Ned Nye and Charles Eichel. Music by Albert Von Tilzer

I Want to Go to the Ball Game. Music by Al W. Brown. Lyrics by C.P. McDonald.

I Want to Go to the Ball Game. Music by Al W. Brown. Lyrics by C.P. McDonald.

Who Would Doubt That I'm A Man. Lyrics by M. S. Music by A. F. Groebl.

Who Would Doubt That I’m A Man. Lyrics by M. S. Music by A. F. Groebl.

Some songs recount how much women wanted to attend baseball games. The lyrics of “I Want to Go to the Ball Game” note that Mabel McCann would rather watch baseball games instead of eat. Compare the lyrics of this song to another also titled, “I Want to Go to the Ball Game. What can students learn from the songs about attitudes toward women going to baseball games?Other songs explore women and their rights in different ways. A song adapted from the comic opera, The Mormons and dedicated to “the New Woman” asks the question “Who Would Doubt that I’m A Man?” Encourage students to use the primary source analysis tool to review this song while you provide support and guiding questions selected from the Sheet Music and Song Sheets Teachers Guide. Do your students think this song was written to encourage women to play baseball?  Why or why not?To learn more about baseball and music, you or your students may explore the online exhibition of Baseball’s Greatest Hits or to explore the Library’s baseball sheet music collection. Students can learn how the music of baseball has helped broaden the discourse on a number of issues including race and patriotism during wartime. Ask them to consider why music about baseball was used as a way to explore social and political issues and to consider if the music used in other sports in the past or the current day generates discussion on social and political issues.